What are Sub-Goals and How Can You Use Them to Your Benefit

Sub-Goals

Sub-goals are the little tasks that must be completed to achieve the primary objective. The issue with goals is that once we have them in our heads, they tend to grow in size and become this massive chore that is nearly difficult to complete.

Then, interestingly enough, whenever we get around to tackling these goals, it generally takes far less time than we’ve previously spent whining and delaying about them.

Goals are the little tasks that must be completed to achieve the primary objective Sub-goals. Some of these sub-goals that become stumbling blocks can be completed in as little as a few minutes! The human being may be a peculiar creature!

Translators, Do You Identify With Any of These Sub-Goals?

• When it comes to attaining their goals, resume changes and website upgrades are sometimes a source of frustration for translators. Just needing to update your résumé because you’re pursuing new expertise, or failing to follow a marketing translation strategy because your website isn’t ready, are two Sub-goals tremendous obstacles a translator may confront.
• Both of these jobs take a little period, yet they seem big in our heads, requiring much too much time and effort. Small research activities might become a translator’s worst nightmare. And it doesn’t matter what the study entails; what matters is that you do it.

Sub-Goals
• Whether you’re going to outsource a task and need to start looking for candidates, or you’re thinking of employing someone to help you with your freelance translation company, these Sub-goals chores might feel enormous, so you keep working on your translation and pretend these sub-goals don’t exist.
• Those chores that you despise are, of course, the most apparent sub-goals. If you hate accounting, for example, you may be late in filing your tax return simply because you did not gather your documents for your accountant.

Suggestions on How to Stop This Self-Destructive Behavior

Creating a deadline for this sub-goals is the most excellent approach to stop ourselves from continuing this self-defeating behavior Sub-goals. Our goals aren’t being finished since, unlike our regular job, they don’t have a deadline — the deadline exists only in our imaginations.

And, of course, after a sub-goal has been on our list for a long time, it loses its feeling of urgency. So create deadlines for these chores and, more crucially, hold yourself responsible to someone else – you’ll soon discover that you’re achieving all of your sub-goals in record time Sub-goals! Said, this means asking a trustworthy coworker, friend, or family member to keep an eye on you and make yourself accountable to them.

Another option for dealing with this issue is to declare defeat and employ someone to help you fulfill your goal. Outsourcing is the term for it, and it might be the most acceptable business choice you ever make. True, entrusting responsibility to someone else might be frightening, but once you’ve met the proper person, you’ll wonder why you waited so long Sub-goals!

more like this, just click on: https://24x7outsourcing.com/blog/

The ultimate option for resolving this problem is to scrap the entire concept. What we mean is that you may not be entirely committed to achieving a particular result, making a goal a non-event.
If you’re an overachiever, acknowledging that you’ve changed your mind about anything might make you feel like a failure; but, you must be completely honest with yourself about your objectives and hence your Sub-goals.

Check the project off your list and let it go if it is no longer vital to you, lucrative, entertaining, or even relevant. There’s a lot more intriguing and enjoyable stuff out there to inspire you!

Here are tips to achieve sub-goals:

1. Set achievable and well-defined objectives.

Sub-Goals

If you’re going to set a goal, be sure it’s something you’ll be able to reach. Create objectives that are specific, quantifiable, reachable, relevant, and time-based to accomplish this (SMART). When you use the SMART technique to create dreams, you’re more likely to achieve them Sub-goals. Make clearly defined objectives that tell you what you need to do to accomplish them, rather than ambiguous goals with no direction. It will be easier for you to do this if your aim is more precise.

2. Make a strategy.

Make a list of the measures you’ll take to reach your objectives. Consider breaking down your overarching aim into smaller objectives. Plan one to three steps you can do each week to assist you to come one step closer to achieving your goal, for example of Sub-goals.

You are focusing on little activities over a long period guarantees that you’re sticking to your strategy and on the right track to accomplishing your objective. It also helps you to celebrate tiny accomplishments along the way to your ultimate goal. This also makes it easier to keep track of your progress.

3. Make a schedule.

Determine a timeframe that represents how long it will take to achieve each of your sub-goals as well as your broader objective once you’ve created a strategy Sub-goal. A timeframe holds you accountable and ensures you stay on track to achieve your goal.

If you miss a deadline you set for yourself for a lesser goal, for example, you’ll know you need to work harder and stay focused to finish your larger objective by the initial date. Setting a deadline might also give you the push you need to keep on with your goal.

4. Consider the challenges.

Setbacks may prohibit you from accomplishing your objective or prevent you from attaining it in the period you planned for, depending on your aim. Consider the roadblocks you could face in achieving your objective and devise a strategy to overcome them.

5. Visualize your objectives and change your thinking.

When it comes to setting objectives, having the appropriate mentality is crucial. Therefore, keep an eye on your attitude during the endeavor and strive to maintain a positive mindset Sub-goals.

Continue Reading, just click on: https://24x7outsourcing.com/blog/

spent whining and delaying about them: https://procrastination.com/what-is-procrastination
frustration for translators: https://www.getblend.com/online-translation/marketing-advertising/
translator’s: https://www.getblend.com/blog/reference-material-for-translations/
employ someone: https://www.getblend.com/blog/pros-and-cons-of-hiring-employees/
SMART: https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/smart-goals.htm

What are Sub-Goals and How Can You Use Them to Your Benefit That You Should Know

What are Sub-Goals and How Can You Use Them to Your Benefit

Sub-goals are the little tasks that must be completed to achieve the primary objective. The issue with goals is that once we have them in our heads, they tend to grow in size and become this massive chore that is nearly difficult to complete.

Then, interestingly enough, whenever we get around to tackling these goals, it generally takes far less time than we’ve previously spent whining and delaying about them.

Goals are the little tasks that must be completed to achieve the primary objective Sub-goals. Some of these sub-goals that become stumbling blocks can be completed in as little as a few minutes! The human being may be a peculiar creature!

Translators, Do You Identify With Any of These Sub-Goals?

• When it comes to attaining their goals, resume changes and website upgrades are sometimes a source of frustration for translators. Just needing to update your résumé because you’re pursuing new expertise, or failing to follow a marketing translation strategy because your website isn’t ready, are two Sub-goals tremendous obstacles a translator may confront.
• Both of these jobs take a little period, yet they seem big in our heads, requiring much too much time and effort. Small research activities might become a translator’s worst nightmare. And it doesn’t matter what the study entails; what matters is that you do it.

Sub-Goals
• Whether you’re going to outsource a task and need to start looking for candidates, or you’re thinking of employing someone to help you with your freelance translation company, these Sub-goals chores might feel enormous, so you keep working on your translation and pretend these sub-goals don’t exist.
• Those chores that you despise are, of course, the most apparent sub-goals. If you hate accounting, for example, you may be late in filing your tax return simply because you did not gather your documents for your accountant.

Suggestions on How to Stop This Self-Destructive Behavior

Creating a deadline for this sub-goals is the most excellent approach to stop ourselves from continuing this self-defeating behavior Sub-goals. Our goals aren’t being finished since, unlike our regular job, they don’t have a deadline — the deadline exists only in our imaginations.

And, of course, after a sub-goal has been on our list for a long time, it loses its feeling of urgency. So create deadlines for these chores and, more crucially, hold yourself responsible to someone else – you’ll soon discover that you’re achieving all of your sub-goals in record time Sub-goals! Said, this means asking a trustworthy coworker, friend, or family member to keep an eye on you and make yourself accountable to them.

Another option for dealing with this issue is to declare defeat and employ someone to help you fulfill your goal. Outsourcing is the term for it, and it might be the most acceptable business choice you ever make. True, entrusting responsibility to someone else might be frightening, but once you’ve met the proper person, you’ll wonder why you waited so long Sub-goals!

more like this, just click on: https://24x7outsourcing.com/blog/

The ultimate option for resolving this problem is to scrap the entire concept. What we mean is that you may not be entirely committed to achieving a particular result, making a goal a non-event.
If you’re an overachiever, acknowledging that you’ve changed your mind about anything might make you feel like a failure; but, you must be completely honest with yourself about your objectives and hence your Sub-goals.

Check the project off your list and let it go if it is no longer vital to you, lucrative, entertaining, or even relevant. There’s a lot more intriguing and enjoyable stuff out there to inspire you!

Here are tips to achieve sub-goals:

1. Set achievable and well-defined objectives.

If you’re going to set a goal, be sure it’s something you’ll be able to reach. Create objectives that are specific, quantifiable, reachable, relevant, and time-based to accomplish this (SMART). When you use the SMART technique to create dreams, you’re more likely to achieve them Sub-goals. Make clearly defined objectives that tell you what you need to do to accomplish them, rather than ambiguous goals with no direction. It will be easier for you to do this if your aim is more precise.

2. Make a strategy.

Make a list of the measures you’ll take to reach your objectives. Consider breaking down your overarching aim into smaller objectives. Plan one to three steps you can do each week to assist you to come one step closer to achieving your goal, for example of Sub-goals.

You are focusing on little activities over a long period guarantees that you’re sticking to your strategy and on the right track to accomplishing your objective. It also helps you to celebrate tiny accomplishments along the way to your ultimate goal. This also makes it easier to keep track of your progress.

3. Make a schedule.

Determine a timeframe that represents how long it will take to achieve each of your sub-goals as well as your broader objective once you’ve created a strategy Sub-goal. A timeframe holds you accountable and ensures you stay on track to achieve your goal.

If you miss a deadline you set for yourself for a lesser goal, for example, you’ll know you need to work harder and stay focused to finish your larger objective by the initial date. Setting a deadline might also give you the push you need to keep on with your goal.

4. Consider the challenges.

Setbacks may prohibit you from accomplishing your objective or prevent you from attaining it in the period you planned for, depending on your aim. Consider the roadblocks you could face in achieving your objective and devise a strategy to overcome them.

5. Visualize your objectives and change your thinking.

When it comes to setting objectives, having the appropriate mentality is crucial. Therefore, keep an eye on your attitude during the endeavor and strive to maintain a positive mindset Sub-goals.

Continue Reading, just click on: https://24x7outsourcing.com/blog/

Your Guide to SMART Goals: How to Do It Wrong, and How to Do It

Did you know that SMART policies can hurt rather than help you?

It is true that SMART principles can help you improve and help you succeed – if you use them properly.

However, if done in the wrong way, it can also hinder your progress and success.

So that leaves us with two questions:

How do you do bad things?

And how do you do it right?

Well, you’re in luck. That is what we will talk about in this article.

We will cover the basics of Intelligent Goals, how they are written, common mistakes when using SMART goals, and additional tips for writing them (or any type of goal) better.

Asambe!

Fundamentals of SMART principles

What Are the Wise Goals?

The SMART Goal is a goal setting framework that uses a summary to help you write better goals. Each letter represents a word that helps remind you of the important things that should be in your goals.

 

What does the SMART summary represent?

S – Specific

 

M – Measurable

 

A – Accessible

 

R – Appropriate / Realistic

 

T – Timed / Timed

(Note that as you read and hear about SMART Goals, you will find that different people use different letters of the alphabet. I set them very common, but know that there are other variations.

S – Specific

Goals should be clear and participatory. Vague goals are a disgrace to success. You need to be clear about what you want.

You and everyone around you should be able to look at your goal quickly and know exactly what you are trying to achieve.

Making your goals clear makes them well-defined and focused. It is clear. You know what you want and others can quickly tell you what you are trying to achieve.

Examples of obscure goals:

To lose weight.

Growing my business.

Increasing sales.

For extra money.

To read other books.

To get better at baseball.

To lift more weight.

Examples of specific terms:

To lose 15 pounds….

To increase my customer base by 10% in my business …

Increase sales by 30%.

To earn $ 20,000 more this year….

Reading 15 izincwadi books

To reduce my error by …

Upgrading my bench-press to 225…

Look at the two different lists. Do you see how clarity makes a difference?

For the first time, you will never know when you will get there. What does “weight loss” mean? Can one ounce work?

What do you mean by growing your business? How many books? 2? What do you mean by more?

In the second list, it is straightforward. You know exactly what you want.

Note: in some cases, you may want to expand on your goals, providing more details. For example, your goal may be to find and buy your dream home, but on a separate sheet of paper or under a goal, you may want to list (perhaps in bullet-point format) everything you want in the house in detail.

M – Measurable

You need to be able to measure your goal. You need to be able to track how well you are doing and whether you have completed the goal or not.

If it cannot be measured, how will you know if you have completed it or not? How do you know if you are on the road or not? How will you know what to aim for and fight for?

The rating gives you a target to identify. It can help motivate and challenge you. It can give you early warning that things are not going well so you can fix it.

And often, by making it clear, you make it more manageable.

Here are some examples:

I increase my typing speed to 80wpm…

Lower by 30 pounds…

Run a mile in less than 7 minutes …

Increase my commission salary by $ 10,000…

Get at least 85 per class.

Putting a man on the moon …

To win first place …

A – Accessible

Accessible means that something is possible, which you can do.

This is where one of the major risks of SMART policies lies.

What happens is that people will often set the bar too low to make sure it is “accessible”. The problem with that does not challenge you or move you forward. (We will discuss this in more detail below).

You want any goal you choose to stretch and challenge you, but it needs to be possible again.

For example, having a goal of running a marathon a week where you have not run for two years is not a reality – it is not achievable.

Five months? That is more accessible but still challenging.

R – Appropriate / Realistic

The truth is in line with the above, the goal is achievable.

In this regard, you need to make sure that your goals are in line with your situation, career and your life. What matters is whether there is a connection or a connection.

Here are some examples:

In the case of a job, make sure that your goals are in line with your job position, your team goals, the goal and the goals of your company as a whole.

In your personal life, be sure to keep in mind your other goals, your values, your priorities, and your long-term goals.

Make sure it fits your lifestyle. Your values ​​and goals when you are a new parent will probably be different than when your children go to college.

T- Timed / Timed

Being on time / Commitment basically means you have a deadline. There is an end to your purpose.

Why do you need a deadline?

Because, without a deadline, there is no urgency to your goal. There is no limit. There is no set time to do it, so it is easy to undo and undo.

When you have the last days, especially the challenging deadlines, do more and do it faster. It is encouraging.

Without it, your chances of achieving your goal are at stake.

How to write your SMART goals

To write down your goals, above all else, here are some tips:

Make it short and fun.

Do not write and write and write. You can write your plan and policy strategies elsewhere. Remember President Kennedy’s policy of putting a man on the moon. It was not a big word and it did not explain all the ideas they had. It was simple and concise. Summary: “Putting a man on the moon and bringing him back safely to the end of the decade.”

Make sure you are accurate.

Anyone who looks at your goal should immediately know that you are pursuing it.

Make sure it is measurable.

If possible, add a number. If not, use events or ratings to indicate when completed. Also, the goal of “putting man on the moon…” was measurable because we know when it was accomplished – when someone came to the moon and came back.

Add a deadline.

Make it clear in time. Challenge yourself. If you “know” you can do it in 12 weeks, shoot 10 or 8.

Make sure you challenge yourself.

Stretch yourself. It’s okay to try “impossible” – but don’t be realistic.

Make sure it fits.

If it does not work at work or in your life right now, you are wasting your time and it can cause misery in your life.

Examples of other SMART policies:

Increase revenue by at least 20% this quarter.

Wear it down by 50 pounds for a summer vacation (June 15).

Complete the first draft of my letter on October 11th.

Learn the basics of Macarena with first school dance.

Run my first marathon on January 11. (With goals like these, you can set small goals such as “Run 7 miles straight to October 1”, etc. or just add them to your schedule).

Go to the gym every week 3 times a week (you can also add “10 weeks” or similar to get a streak goal. Then celebrate when you reach it).

Read 1 book a week each week this year.

Common errors for SMART Objectives

Now that we have considered the basics of SMART principles, let us examine some common mistakes we make when making and pursuing them.

1. We set the bar too low

As mentioned earlier, one of the great dangers of SMART goals is that to make it “accessible” or “achievable”, we put the bar very low.

This is dangerous for a number of reasons:

First, by always setting goals that we know we can meet, we are not moving forward as far as we can.

Great progress and success come from the pursuit of ambition and “impossible” goals.

Take Kennedy’s goal of putting a man on the moon and come back at the end of the decade. That was the goal of prominence. They did not know how to do it.

But they took the challenge and did it. If he had set a goal that they “did not know” to do, we would not have reached the moon, and the goal itself would not have been inspiring.

Second, if all you do is set simple goals that you know you can achieve, you will not be as diligent as you would like them to be.

That is another aspect of challenging goals – encouraging and motivating. We are not encouraged by simple rules of practice. We are inspired and inspired by challenges that are simple to us.

If you set and reach goals, you will be motivated to do so.

In fact, Brian Tracy, one of the goal-oriented educators, has to set his own goals so that there is a 50% chance of failure.

So what does this mean for your goals?

Challenge yourself. Stretch yourself. Do something possible, but make it a challenge for you too.

You will be more motivated and others around you (if the team goal) will be more motivated.

We’ll talk about using the expanded goals with SMART principles soon.

(On the note side, in the case of a business, be aware of how SMART principles are applied and applied.

2. We set the bar too high

Just as it is dangerous to put the bar too low, it is dangerous to put it too high.

Wait a minute! Wait a minute!! Stop the tapes! Didn’t you just say we challenged ourselves?

Yes, yes I did. In fact, we will talk later about the importance of shooting impossible for simple purposes.

At the same time, if we set unreasonably high or lofty goals, that can be harmful.

First, it can raise the bar.

If you continue to set goals that are too high for you to achieve, it can cause you to slow down and cause you to stop setting goals and trying.

Second, if we have a goal that we do not really have, we can only guess. We can’t really try to make it happen because we don’t believe we can.

Does that make sense?

So challenge yourself, stretch yourself to where you can fail, but don’t be silly again. Give yourself another victory.

If your confidence level is low, start with smaller goals and build as you gain victory.

3. We use SMART policy as a cash outlet, a boost to feel happy

Another danger of SMART principles is that we use them as emotional enhancements.

Instead of challenging ourselves or pushing ourselves forward, we set goals that are easy to achieve, as part of our daily activities, so that we can scratch it when we finish, because scratching it sounds fun.

That is dangerous. That does not move you forward as a person and it does not move your company forward.

It is good that you feel complete in order to achieve your goals. You must. You have to celebrate the truth.

But you should be able to achieve worthwhile goals and do nothing to improve your mood.

4. We set daily activities and plans as goals

One issue I have noticed with SMART principles is that people set their daily plans and activities as SMART goals.

Why is that bad?

If all you do is set your regular routine as your goal, you are accomplishing nothing. You are not advised. You do not move forward.

It’s just your daily routine.

An easy-to-reach goal, to get out of the checkbox, but it does not move you as a person or your company.

The goal is to move you forward.

Often, a goal is a goal that you want to achieve. Then come up with a plan, activities, and plan to help you get there.

You may also have a career goal, such as running 3 times a week, but it is a goal to start doing something you have not yet done, not something you are. Once you have done that practice, you will change or update your goal.

5. We make it incredibly tall

The shorter the better. The summary is better.

Long-term goals are neither encouraging nor encouraging. In fact, the longer they are, the more confused they may be and the less likely we are to read them or rewrite them (something you can do to remind yourself of your goals and stay focused on them).

Shorter and shorter.

Consider Kennedy’s goal: to put a man on the moon and bring him back safely to the end of ten years.

If that were the case: Our goal is to build a spacecraft that can carry many people safely through space and then have the technology that will allow you to travel to the moon and land on it and back and forth. We will achieve this goal at the end of the decade.

Which is more encouraging? Which is more encouraging? What is it that you might read and rewrite?

You want to be clear, but also as short and concise as possible.

Some SMART examples require you to write something for each SMART character and complete the section. Don’t do that.

Make it short and fun. You can always write your plan or steps to get there separately.

6. We marry with our strategies (and we set our goals in our goals)

There is a difference between your goal and the strategies you use to achieve your goals.

Your goal is to achieve what you want. It usually does not change unless you need to make some changes as you go along as you learn more. But basically it is always the same, in some possible variations.

Your strategies, however, are worth changing. You are not married to your tactics.

If you want to lose 50 pounds in the summer, you may want to try different strategies. Your first plan might be to go to the gym three times a week and eat a different diet.

Your goal is to lose weight; your strategy is a gym and eat differently.

What if you are not progressing toward your goal the way you should? Does that mean you have failed?

No.

Change your strategy. Maybe you will do something in the gym. Maybe you will change your eating habits even more. You will probably go to the gym a lot of times. Maybe you will start running or walking before work.

Maybe you will join Weight Watchers. You will probably find friends who will accuse you.

Your goal is always the same. Your strategy is changing.

Do not marry with your strategy. If it doesn’t work, try something else!

This is one reason why I would not encourage you to write your plan for your goal (it also makes it longer if you do that!).

Instead, write down your goal, which is short and fun and short.

Then, on a piece of paper or on a separate sheet of paper, write down a strategy that you can work on to achieve that. Find two or three that you think will have a big impact, and focus on that.

If they do not work, your goal is always the same, just try something else.

Very encouraging, easy to read and rewrite if you have a goal such as:

“Lower it by 50 pounds for a summer vacation.”

there

“My goal is to lose 50 pounds over the summer holidays. I will do this by working 3 times a week and eating better food. My diet will include…. ”…

Get the point?

You can write all that extra part in your plan or as a small goal.

Tips for better SMART goals (and achievements)

1. Make sure you are committed to your goal

One of the reasons we may not be motivated and / or fail to achieve our SMART goals (any goal) is that we are not enthusiastic about the goal.

If we are not interested in it, we will not put in the effort to make it happen. This often happens because someone wants us to do it. It is not our goal – it is theirs.

If you are not your own, when difficult and difficult times come, you probably will not persist.

Make sure that your goals are what you are aiming for.

If it is a goal you have to make, like a job, find a way to own it and fall in love with it. Find your own “why” goal. Find a reason to do it and let that motivation help you to move forward.

2. Find your “why”

One of the best ways to stay motivated is to remember the “why” of the goal you set.

Why are you pursuing your career goals? Why are you trying to lose weight? Why do you read so many books? Why do you want to run a marathon?

Know your “why” and write it down.

Visualize it too. See the finished result. See why you want to do it.

Then, when things go awry, look at your “why” and remember why.

3. Apply small goals

We have said this before in a separate section briefly.

With bigger goals, you may want to break it down into smaller goals.

For example, if your main goal is to increase revenue, to do so you will probably need to contact potential customers or sell more to current customers. You can set a minimum goal to communicate with 10 or more customers per week, for example.

Dividing goals into smaller goals can make it more manageable.

4. Make a plan

Once you have your goal in mind, make a plan to achieve it. There are various ways to do this.

You can start at the end and go back every step you need to take to get to that point (see the step you will need to take to complete the goal, then follow the step to get to that point, etc.).

You can also list all the steps you need to do that you know and arrange them in order and priorities.

Also, when you do not know exactly what the next step might be, or if you do not know many steps or how to do it, focus on the first step, and follow it.

You do not need to have a full plan (in fact, over-analysis and over-planning can hurt you if you are not careful). Find out what action or steps you need to take, and then take action!

5. Take immediate action

Once you have your goal in mind, take action immediately to understand your goal, right away, or, at least, that day.

The longer you take to get started, the less likely you are to start, so start early and it will be a small and easy thing to reach your goal.

Get the momentum.

6. Make a score card, gammify, and / or tie your goal

Score boards

Score boards work because they let you know where you are right now with your goal. By looking at them, you can quickly tell if you are focused, forward, or left behind.

It can give you incentive to move forward, and it can let you know when you may need to make changes if something does not work.

Gamifying and chaining

Whether through a scoreboard or an app or something else, balancing your goals can help you stay motivated and achieve them. Other apps you can try include habatica and liverpg.

Jerry Seinfeld is famous for his red X series that he created when he wrote jokes. His goal was to write jokes every day, so he put a big red X in the calendar every day when he did it.

In time, he developed a series of red X-rays. That was the motivation to continue because he did not want to break the chain.

And if you break it, seeing all the red Xs can show you all your success in the past you had so you don’t get so frustrated with missing a day.

You can do that by running, or whenever you end your client’s calls or so on.

Find a way to gamify, track, or combine your goals, and you’ll be more likely to complete them.

7. Keep reviewing your goals

Regardless of the day, week, or month, take the time to review your goals. See where you are, where you are doing well and where you can improve.

See what works and what doesn’t. If your strategy doesn’t work, try something else!

Updating your goals can help remind you, stay on track, and help you make changes as you approach your goal.

8. Forgive yourself

You will make mistakes and you will have failures. You may not meet your last days.

All right. Forgive yourself, learn from it, and move on.

If you find that you are setting a deadline, do not push yourself, just change the deadline and continue working on it.

9. Use extended goals with SMART goal

In his book Smarter Faster Better, Charles Duhigg discusses some of the potential dangers of the aforementioned wise goals.

Another great suggestion he has in the book is that we can match simple goals with SMART goals.

Extension goals are those goals that we do not know how to achieve. The “impossible” guy (like Kennedy and the moon).

Duhigg gives the example of Jack Welch at GE. The Aircraft Manufacturing Unit says it will reduce the number of engine failures by 25%. They thought that they could easily do that.

Welch e GE

Welch said he made 70% in 3 years.

They thought it was impossible, but they began to make changes. And making changes. And making changes.

In order to achieve their goal they eventually change who they are hired for, how they are trained and how the firm operates. They end up reducing errors by 75% and reducing costs by 10%.

Japanese bullet train

Another example Duhigg gives is the bullet trains in Japan. Tens of thousands of people travel between Tokyo and Osaka over 320 miles of railway and industrial equipment. The journey can take up to 20 hours.

To help revive the economy, the head of the Japanese railway system in 1955 ordered them to set up a high-speed train. When they unveiled one 65 mph, which was very fast at the time, he said, not enough, 120mph.

They say it is “impossible”. He was persistent, so they began to make changes. And little by little, they increase speeds up to 120 mph. They exchanged trains and trains. They dug tunnels in the mountains.

In 1964 the world’s first bullet train traveled from Tokyo to Osaka in three hours and 58 minutes. Their bullet trains have helped revitalize their economy.

All because someone believed in him and pushed the impossible.

Do not be afraid of the impossible. Be willing to stretch out and try crazy.

One way to do that, according to Duhigg, is to create simple goals, and then use SMART goals to help you get to a simple goal.

Matching both can help you to do the “impossible”.

For example, the purpose of the stretch was to create a 120mph train. SMART goals are all the small goals they have made to make the train go faster, step by step.

10. Avoid scoring multiple goals at once

It can be easy to become ambitious and shoot 20 different goals at once. However, when we do that, we not only put a lot of effort into any goal, we easily get discouraged and we do not make ANY goal.

It is good to make a list of goals that you want to achieve. But, instead of trying to do them all at once, look at them and decide which goal will have the biggest impact on your life or career, and then focus on that goal. If you do a lot, do at least 2-3.

If not, you will not give each goal the attention it needs.

 

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